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Collection of catches and glees, mainly of the 17th-18th cent., probably from printed editions

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MS. Mus. d. 296

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Collection of catches and glees, mainly of the 17th-18th cent., copied by B. Brown between May and August 1829 (see dates at the end of some items), most probably from printed sources. The glees are in a separate section (pp. 129-170) with the volume reversed.
  1. (p. 5) Henry Purcell: My lady's coachman John. [Z. 260]. For 3 voices;
  2. (p. 5) Henry Purcell: As Roger last night. [Z. 242]. For 3 voices;
  3. (p. 6) Henry Purcell: The miller's daughter riding to the fair. [Z. 277]. For 3 voices;
  4. (p. 6) Michael Wise: When Judith had laid Holofernes in bed. For 3 voices;
  5. (p. 7) Henry Harington: Jack thou'rt a toper. For 3 voices;
  6. (p. 7) [Edmund Nelham]: Thus saith the preacher. For 3 voices;
  7. (p. 8) Jeremiah Clarke: Here's a health to the King. For 3 voices;
  8. (p. 8) [Thomas Ravenscroft]: What care had I to marry a shrew. For 3 voices;
  9. (p. 9) Luffman Atterbury: Joan said to John. For 3 voices;
  10. (p. 10) Adrian Willaert: Amen Allelujah. 'Canon 4 in 2 by inversion'. For 4 voices;
  11. (p. 10) Charles King: O Absalom my son. For 3 voices;
  12. (p. 11) Maurice Greene: Mortals learn your lives to measure. For 3 voices;
  13. (p. 11) Maurice Greene: On the poor confin'd debtors. For 3 voices;
  14. (p. 12) Maurice Greene: Hail green fields. For 3 voices;
  15. (p. 12) William Boyce: Long live King George. For 4 voices;
  16. (p. 13) [Henry Carey]: Curs'd be the wretch that bought and sold. For 3 voices;
  17. (p. 13) Edmund Gregory: Let us be merry in our old cloaths. For 4 voices;
  18. (p. 13) William Hayes: Poor Johnny's dead. For 3 voices;
  19. (p. 14) John Travers: Doubtless the pleasure is as great. For 3 voices;
  20. (p. 14) [John Travers]: Life is a jest. For 4 voices;
  21. (p. 14) Weedon [=?John Weldon]: By pipe and tot. For 4 voices;
  22. (pp. 14-15) Weedon [=?John Weldon]: O be joyful in the Lord all ye lands. 'Canon in the 4th and 8th below'. For 3 voices;
  23. (p. 15) Jhn [= ?Joseph or Jacob Cubitt] Pring: Did Celia's person and her mind agree. For 4 voices;
  24. (p. 15) [Anon.]: Noyons dans ce bon vin. For 3 voices;
  25. (p. 16) Joseph Baildon: Ye heav'ns, if innocence deserves your care. 'For 3 ladies';
  26. (p. 16) Charles Burney: Jack and Jill went up a hill. For 4 voices;
  27. (p. 16) [Antonio Caldara?]: Alza te il fiasco [Alzate il fiasco]. For 3 voices;
  28. (p. 17) Henry Purcell: Pox on you for a fop. [Z. 268]. For 3 voices;
  29. (p. 18) Henry Purcell: Now we are met. [Z. 262]. For 3 voices;
  30. (p. 18) John Eccles: Confusion to the pow'r of Cupid. For 3 voices;
  31. (p. 19) John Blow: How shall we speak. For 3 voices;
  32. (p. 19) Henry Purcell: Once in our lives. [Z. 264]. For 3 voices;
  33. (p. 19) Edmund Nelham: Jack, come hither Jack. For 3 voices;
  34. (p. 20) Henry Purcell: Since time so kind to us does prove. [Z. 272]. For 3 voices;
  35. (pp. 20-21) Henry Purcell: Sum up all the delights. [Z. 275]. For 3 voices;
  36. (p. 21) William Child: If any so wise is. For 3 voices;
  37. (p. 22) Henry Purcell: He that drinks is immortal. [Z. 254]. For 3 voices;
  38. (p. 22) Henry Purcell: I gave her cakes. [Z. 256]. For 3 voices;
  39. (p. 23) Henry Purcell: Is Charleroys' siege come too. [Z. 257]. For 3 voices;
  40. (p. 23) Henry Purcell: One industrious insect. 'A rebus on Mr. Anthony Hall, Mermaid Tavern, Oxford'. [Z. 266]. For 3 voices;
  41. (p. 24) Jean Claude Gillier: Crown the glass. For 3 voices;
  42. (p. 24) B. Brown: Full bags a brisk bottle. For 3 voices;
  43. (p. 25) Garrett Colley Wellesley, Earl of Mornington: John Knox loves his pipe. For 3 voices;
  44. (p. 26) [J. B]. Marella: Jack thou'rt a. 'Catch of catches, gain'd a prize'. For 3 voices;
  45. (p. 27) Henry Harington: I cannot sing this catch. 'Laughing catch'. For 3 voices;
  46. (p. 27) [Anon. - Ravenscroft?]: My dame has in her hut at home. For 3 voices;
  47. (p. 27) Samuel Arnold: Such a liar is Tom. For 3 voices;
  48. (pp. 28-29) Thomas Arne: The maid's with child. For 3 voices;
  49. (p. 29) Jeremiah Clarke: In drinking full bumpers. For 3 voices;
  50. (p. 30) Henry Purcell: Under this stone lies Gabriel John. 'An old epitaph'. [Z. 286]. For 3 voices;
  51. (p. 30) Henry Purcell [?]: All into service. Not in Zimmerman. For 3 voices;
  52. (p. 30) Henry Purcell: Let's live good honest lives. Also attrib. to William Cranford. [Z. D102]. For 3 voices;
  53. (p. 31) [Thomas Holmes]: Have you observ'd the wench in the street. For 3 voices;
  54. (p. 31) Henry Purcell: If all be true that I do think. [Z. 255]. For 3 voices;
  55. (p. 32) Henry Purcell: Bring the bowl and cool Nantz. [Z. 243]. For 3 voices;
  56. (p. 32) Henry Purcell: Prithee be not so sad. [Z. 269]. For 3 voices;
  57. (p. 33) Henry Purcell: Wine in a morning makes us frolic. [Z. 289]. For 3 voices;
  58. (p. 34) Richard Brown: Come boy, light a faggot. For 3 voices;
  59. (pp. 34-35) Henry Purcell: Come let us drink. [Z. 245]. For 3 voices;
  60. (p. 35) Henry Purcell: The surrender of Lim'rick. [Z. 278]. For 3 voices;
  61. (p. 36) Garrett Colley Wellesley, Earl of Mornington: Says Sue to Prue on a summer's day. For 3 voices;
  62. (p. 36) [Anon.]: Hic jacet Tom Short Hose. For 3 voices. The usual text is: Hic jacet John Short Hose;
  63. (p. 37) Henry Purcell: Who comes there? Stand! [Z. 288]. For 3 voices;
  64. (p. 37) Edmund Nelham: Cuckow good neighbour help us. For 3 voices;
  65. (p. 38) Henry Purcell: Soldier, take off thy wine. [Z. 274]. For 4 voices;
  66. (p. 38) Henry Purcell: The Macedon youth left behind. [Z. 276]. For 4 voices;
  67. (p. 39) [William Byrd]: O hold your hands or loose your lands. For 4 voices;
  68. (p. 39) Henry Purcell: Young John the gard'ner. [Z. 292]. For 4 voices;
  69. (p. 40) Henry Purcell: Under a green elm lies Luke Shepherd's helm. [Z. 285]. For 4 voices;
  70. (p. 40) Henry Purcell: 'Tis too late for a coach. [Z. 280]. For 3 voices;
  71. (p. 41) [Anon.]: A fid'ler and fudler are always together. For 3 voices;
  72. (p. 41) George Day: Come drink about Tom. 'Catch on good claret'. For 3 voices;
  73. (pp. 42-43) John Blow: Ring the bells and the glasses pull away. 'On the King coming home'. For 3 voices;
  74. (p. 43) Henry Purcell: Let us drink to the blades. [Z. 259]. For 3 voices;
  75. (p. 43) Edmund Nelham: Take a pound of butter. For 4 voices;
  76. (p. 44) Henry Purcell: Here's that will challenge all the fair. [Z. 253]. For 3 voices;
  77. (p. 44) [Henry Purcell?/John Blow?/Francis Forcer?]: Tis women make us love [Z. 281]. For 4 voices. [Variously attributed in other sources];
  78. (p. 45) Henry Purcell: Drink on till night be spent. [Z. 248]. For 3 voices;
  79. (p. 45) Edmund Nelham: Tobacco's but a vapour. For 4 voices;
  80. (p. 46) Henry Purcell: Pale faces stand by. [Z. 267]. For 3 voices;
  81. (p. 46) Edmund Nelham: The wily fox with his many wily mocks. For 3 voices;
  82. (p. 47) [William Byrd]: Hey ho to the greenwood. 'Canon three in one'. For 3 voices;
  83. (p. 48) Michael Wise: From twenty to thirty. For 4 voices;
  84. (p. 48) Henry Purcell: Would you know how we meet. 'Words by Mr. Otway'. [Z. 290]. For 3 voices;
  85. (p. 49) Henry Purcell: Room for th'express. [Z. 270]. For 3 voices;
  86. (p. 49) Henry Purcell: Here's a health, pray let it pass about. [Z. 252]. For 3 voices;
  87. (p. 50) William Byrd, attrib.: Come drink to me. For 4 voices;
  88. (p. 51) Mr. Creed: I hate dissembling courtiers. For 3 voices;
  89. (p. 51) Henry Hall: Oil and vinegar are two pretty things. For 3 voices;
  90. (p. 52) Henry Purcell, attrib.: I cannot get up. Not in Zimmerman. For 3 voices;
  91. (p. 52) William Hayes: When England shall be out of debt. For 3 voices;
  92. (p. 53) [Anon.]: The longitude mist on Miston. For 3 voices. Not the glee setting by B. Cooke;
  93. (p. 53) [Anon.]: Long live our King. For 3 voices;
  94. (p. 54) Simon Ives: Boy go down and fill the other quart. For 3 voices;
  95. (p. 55) William Cranford: Jack, Sam and Dick, meeting at the White Hart. For 3 voices;
  96. (p. 56) William Cranford: Some ages in story. For 3 voices;
  97. (pp. 56-57) John Smith [also attrib. to Henry Smith]: The silver swan, who living had no note. For 3 voices;
  98. (p. 57) Henry Purcell: To all lovers of music. [Z. 282]. For 3 voices;
  99. (p. 58) William Cranford: This ale, my bonny lad. 'For three basses';
  100. (p. 58) Edmund Nelham: Follow me my jovial boys. For 3 voices;
  101. (pp. 58-59) Henry Purcell: Of all the instruments that are. [Z. 263]. For 3 voices;
  102. (p. 59) John Cobb: These are the cries of London Town. For 4 voices;
  103. (p. 60) [Anon.]: Some say that Signor Bononcini. For 3 voices. [Words derived from John Byrom's epigram];
  104. (pp. 60-61) John Eccles: Hark Harry, tis late. For 3 voices;
  105. (p. 61) William Cranford: Come hither Tom and make up three. For 3 voices;
  106. (p. 61) William Hayes: Gut eats all day. 'Epigram by Ben Johnson'. For 3 voices;
  107. (pp. 62-63) Henry Aldrich: Good indeed the herb's good weed. For 4 voices;
  108. (p. 63) John Blow: God preserve his majesty. 'The Kings health'. For 4 voices;
  109. (p. 63) [Anon.]: Your merry poets old boys. For 3 voices;
  110. (p. 64) William Hayes: Wilt thou lend me thy mare. For 4 voices;
  111. (pp. 64-65) William Hayes: The hammer was up. For 4 voices;
  112. (p. 65) William Hayes: Hum drum sits my old daddy at home. 'The young rake'. For 3 voices;
  113. (p. 66) William Hayes: As they tramp up and down. 'Cries at Oxford races'. For 5 voices;
  114. (p. 67) William Hayes: Why neighbours, why this noise and strife. 'The tailor, his wife, and neighbour'. For 3 voices;
  115. (p. 67) [Henry Harington]: Look neighbours look. For 3 voices;
  116. (p. 68) [Lord Mornington (Garrett Colley Wellesley)]: As Roger was sitting one ev'ning with Nan. For 3 voices;
  117. (p. 69) John Wall Callcott: Have you Sir John Hawkins' hist'ry. 'Gain'd a prize 1789'. For 3 voices;
  118. (p. 70) John Stafford Smith: Sir you're a rascal. For 3 voices;
  119. (pp. 70-71) John Wall Callcott: A beauteous fair has stole my heart. For 3 voices;
  120. (p. 71) [Anon.]: A southerly wind and a cloudy sky. For 3 voices;
  121. (p. 72) Samuel Webbe (1740-1816): Would you know my Celia's charms. For 4 voices;
  122. (pp. 72-73) [Anon.]: While Adam slept. For 4 voices;
  123. (p. 73) Luffman Atterbury: Hodge told Sue he lov'd her. For 3 voices;
  124. (p. 73) William Hayes: Chairs to mend. For 3 voices;
  125. (p. 74) Garrett Colley Wellesley, Earl of Mornington: Twas you Sir, I tell you nothing new Sir. For 3 voices;
  126. (pp. 74-75): Luffman Atterbury: You must go, for John Rogers. For 3 voices;
  127. (p. 75) John Hilton: Come follow me. For 3 voices;
  128. (pp. 76-77) Thomas Arne: I'll back the mealy grey. 'The cock match'. For 4 voices;
  129. (p. 77) Henry Purcell [really by Henry Aldrich]: Hark the bonny Christchurch bells. For 3 voices;
  130. (pp. 78-79) Thomas Arne: Dear Jenny, I love you. 'The bustle. Gain'd a prize 1768'. For 3 voices;
  131. (p. 79) Thomas Arne: Buz quoth the blue fly. For 4 voices;
  132. (p. 80) John Stevenson: Come buy my cherries. For 4 voices;
  133. (pp. 80-81) Samuel Webbe (1740-1816): Begone ev'ry doubt. 'Jupiter and Semele'. For 3 voices;
  134. (p. 82) Samuel Webbe (1740-1816): To the old long life and treasure. For 3 voices;
  135. (p. 83) Joseph Baildon: Master Tommy marry. For 4 voices;
  136. (pp. 84-85) Joseph Baildon: When is it best, said John to Joan. 'On a dram'. For 4 voices;
  137. (p. 85) Henry Harington: Sister I say, dost thou affection. 'The Quakers wedding'. For 3 voices;
  138. (p. 85) Henry Harington: Tis hum drum, tis mum mum. 'Yawning catch'. For 3 voices;
  139. (p. 86) Joseph Baildon: Adam catch'd Eve by the furbelou. For 3 voices;
  140. (p. 86) Samuel Webbe (1740-1816): Come Roger and Nell. For 3 voices;
  141. (pp. 86-87) [Anon.]: At the Cross Keys you may have what you please. For 3 voices;
  142. (p. 87) Henry Harington: Hark, sing, my lord's come in. For 3 voices;
  143. (pp. 88-89) John Wall Callcott: Ah, how Sophia can you leave. For 3 voices;
  144. (p. 89) [Anon.]: Sweet Miss Pine, pray how do you. For 3 voices;
  145. (p. 90) Nicholson: O my good friends, Lord, what do you think. For 3 voices;
  146. (pp. 91-92) Samuel Webbe (1740-1816); Mister, will you do us the favor. For 3 voices;
  147. (p. 92) Edmund Thomas Warren-Horne: To our musical club. For 3 voices;
  148. (p. 93) Joseph Baildon: Mr. Speaker, tho tis late. For 3 voices;
  149. (pp. 94-95) Stephen Paxton: Ye muses inspire me. 'Gain'd a prize medal 1783'. For 3 voices;
  150. (p. 95) Henry Harington: Twine gentle evergreens. 'Epitaph'. For 3 voices;
  151. (p. 96) George Berg: Sirs, the Serpentine River is coming upstairs. For 3 voices;
  152. (pp. 96-97) Benjamin Cuzens: Says Phillis to Chloe. For 3 voices;
  153. (p. 97) John Jenkins: A boat, haste to the ferry. For 3 voices;
  154. (p. 97) [Bromley?]: Mercy and truth have met together. For 3 voices;
  155. (p. 98) Thomas Brewer: Tis Amarillis walking all alone. For 3 voices;
  156. (p. 98) William Hayes: You beat your pate. For 3 voices;
  157. (p. 99) [Anon.]: Now God be with Old Simeon. For 3 voices;
  158. (p. 99) William Hayes: When Chloe's kind, my heart feels gay. For 3 voices;
  159. (p. 100) George Berg: How happy are we. For 3 voices;
  160. (pp. 100-101) [William Hayes]: Haste ye soft gales to my relief. For 3 voices;
  161. (p. 101) [Henry Harington]: How great is the pleasure. For 3 voices;
  162. (p. 101) [S. Leach?]: Go gentle breezes. For 3 voices;
  163. (p. 102) [Felice Giardini]: O beauteous eyes discover. For 3 voices;
  164. (p. 102) John Hilton: Come hither boy. For 3 voices;
  165. (p. 102) [Anon.]: Do, re, mi, fa. For 4 voices;
  166. (p. 103) [Edmund Nelham]: Have you any work for a tinker, mistress. For 3 voices;
  167. (p. 103) Edmund Gregory: Fill a brimming glass. For 3 voices;
  168. (p. 104) Luffman Atterbury: Sweet enslaver, can you tell. For 3 voices;
  169. (p. 104) William Hayes: Phillis, my fairest. For 3 voices;
  170. (p. 105) [George Holmes]: Come pull away boys. For 3 voices;
  171. (p. 106) Simon Ives: Come honest friends and jovial boys. For 3 voices;
  172. (pp. 106-107) James Nares: Wilt thou lend me thy mare. For 3 voices;
  173. (p. 107) [Maurice Greene]: How soft the delights. For 3 voices;
  174. (p. 108) George Berg: Let us drink and be merry. For 3 voices;
  175. (pp. 108-109) 'Alter'd from Mons. L'Clerc': Rural sports are sweeter far. For 4 voices;
  176. (p. 109) Samuel Howard: Jean vows to hearten tim'rous youth. For 4 voices;
  177. (pp. 110-111) Samuel Webbe (1740-1816): Tis time sure to call for the coffee. For 3 voices;
  178. (p. 111) George Berg: Not a day more than thirty. For 3 voices;
  179. (pp. 112-113) Thomas Arne: Hark you my dear. 'The street intrigue'. For 3 voices;
  180. (pp. 114-116) Thomas Arne: Do, re, mi, fa, sol, la. 'The singing club'. For 5 voices;
  181. (pp. 116-117) Samuel Webbe (1740-1816): Let's be merry and banish care. For 3 voices;
  182. (p. 117) Samuel Webbe (1740-1816): Here rests my wife. 'Epitaph' For 3 voices;
  183. (pp. 118-120) Samuel Webbe (1740-1816): See the jolly god appears. For 4 voices;
  184. (p. 120) J. B. Marella: Half an hour past twelve o' clock. For 4 voices;
  185. (pp. 120-121) Edmund Thomas Warren-Horne: To our musical club. For 3 voices;
  186. (pp. 121-123) Joseph Baildon: Cried Strephon panting in dear Chloe's arms. For 3 voices;
  187. (p. 124) Luffman Atterbury: One a penny, two a penny. For 3 voices;
  188. (p. 125) William Hayes: O Lord, how glorious are thy works. 'Canon 3 in 1'. For 3 voices;
  189. (p. 126) William Hayes: Hear my pray'r, O Lord. 'Canon six in one'. For 6 voices;
  190. (pp. 170-166 rev.) Samuel Webbe (1740-1816): Hail star of Brunswick. For 4 voices.
  191. (pp. 165-162 rev.) John Danby: The fairest flow'rs. For 3 voices;
  192. (pp. 161-159 rev.) Benjamin Cooke: Hark the lark. For 4 voices;
  193. (p. 159 rev.) [Henry Harington]: Look neighbours, look. 'Old Thomas Day'. Catch. For 3 voices;
  194. (pp. 158-157 rev.) [Stephen Storace], 'Harmonized by Harrison': Peaceful slumb'ring on the ocean. 'Lullaby'. For 4 voices;
  195. (pp. 156-154 rev.) Richard J. S. Stevens: Prithee foolish boy. For 3 voices;
  196. (pp. 154-150 rev.) Luffman Atterbury: Who like Bacchus. For 3 voices;
  197. (p. 150) Henry Harington: Give me the sweet delights of love. 'The delights of love'. For 3 voices;
  198. (pp. 149-147 rev.) John Danby: Fair Flora seeks the flow'r ground. For 3 voices;
  199. (pp. 147-143 rev.) William Horsley: See the chariot at hand. For 4 voices;
  200. (pp. 143-140 rev.) Michael East: How merrily we live. For 3 voices;
  201. (pp. 139-138 rev.) Thomas Ford: Since first I saw your face. For 4 voices;
  202. (pp. 138-135 rev.) John Clarke-Whitfeld: Turn holy father. For 4 voices, with piano acc.;
  203. (pp. 135-130 rev.) John Wall Callcott: Peace to the souls of the heroes. For 3 voices;
  204. (p. 129 rev.) Benjamin Cooke. In paper case. For 4 voices. Incomplete.

Dates

  • May-Aug 1829

Extent

172 pages

Language of Materials

  • English

Preferred Citation

Oxford, Bodleian Libraries [followed by shelfmark, e.g. MS. Mus. d. 296, pp. 1-2].
Please see our help page for further guidance on citing archives and manuscripts.

Shelfmark:

MS. Mus. d. 296

Collection ID (for staff)

CMD ID 16042

Abstract

Collection of catches and glees by several composers. Mainly of the 17th-18th centuries. Copied by B. Brown between May and August 1829.

Biographical / Historical

Biographical details unknown.

Custodial History

'B. Brown' on upper board label. Former shelfmark (Faculty of Music Library): [B. Brown] (Misc. 8).

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Transferred from the Faculty of Music Library, 1995.

Physical Facet

172 pages; 12 staves to a page. Watermark: JM&M. Binding: half calf with marbled paper covered boards (spine renewed). Binding: half calf with marbled paper covered boards (spine renewed).
Title
Collection of catches and glees, mainly of the 17th-18th cent.
Status
Completed
Date
EAD version 2019 by Hannah Jordan and Margaret Czepiel
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Repository Details

Part of the Bodleian Libraries Repository

Contact:
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